Archive | March 2015

 

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A Feeding Frenzy

Posted by on Mar 18, 2015 in Blog, March 2015 | 0 comments

A Feeding Frenzy

It started last year with me, a stage reading mentee director participating in the staged reading of Necessary Targets as an actor. The Mentor Director, Julia Wharton wanted us, would be stage reading directors, to experience the process as actors/directors in training. I got to understand better the vulnerability that actor experiences and the trust that is needed to be built between an actor and a director. In the meetings with Julie, directors reflected what their perceived strengths and weaknesses were. I remember saying my weakness being that of impatience with actors in the rehearsals, sometimes. My resolve then was to learn from this experience the art of directing a stage reading and also how to do away with this weakness of being impatient. From the stage reading of Necessary Targets to observing the rehearsals of Fabulation directed by mentee director Patience G. Tawengwa I squirreled away information, learning as much as I could of the skills set to use later on in my stage reading debut. I knew that I needed as much as I could in order to prepare. I had been given the tools to use and had the wonderful support of the Mentor Director and my fellow stage reading director mentees.

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Fabulous Fabulation

Posted by on Mar 17, 2015 in Blog, March 2015 | 0 comments

Fabulous Fabulation

When I first read “Fabulation or The Re-Education of Undine” I was drawn in by the similarities which exist between Undine’s self discovery journey and the search for identity for many of us contemporary Africans. Most Africans of my generation have parents who were born and raised in the rural areas of colonial Africa, only after independence were black Africans able to freely move from “Africans only” designated townships to the affluent and formerly all white suburbs. My generation became beneficiaries of a lifestyle and opportunities which our parents never had access to. The multi-racial schools we attended had an english language only policy and we were not allowed to speak our own African languages, that rule created within us a belief that english language and culture were superior and synonymous with education and civilization and our own mother tongue and culture inferior and aligned with being backward. There was a shift in values and to the younger generation non-english speaking rural relatives became “uncool” and their presence in certain social settings elicited a sense of shame.

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