Archive | July 2013

 

web-archive-title2

The Power of Passing It On

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 in Blog, July 2013 | 0 comments

The Power of Passing It On

When I graduated from college I knew it all. I was not an actor, I was an Artist (if this were a French keyboard I would have added the accent mark over the “i”. That is how confident I was). I was ready for the world. There was no play I couldn’t do, no television series I wasn’t ready for, no film I couldn’t get a respectable role in. The last thing on my mind was going back to school. I was ready, I tell you. I had trained enough! Now, I should clarify that, though I LOVE my alma mater and had wonderful professors that sowed great seeds of character and presence into me, much of my acting training was inspired by the genius and the diligence of those students I shared classes with. We were a dedicated bunch. On occasions when we didn’t feel challenged by the curriculum, we took matters into our own hands. We went home and did the work. We rehearsed with each other way after hours and even challenged ourselves to do and perform pieces the professors hadn’t asked for. We were focused because we loved acting. We wanted all we could get from it. We longed to give it all we had. So after I left school, I decided that I had been through the trenches and had won many battles. I was prepared for the war. (Oh, how I miss that precious time in life when I was sure I knew it all).

READ MORE

The Importance of Cross Cultural Artistic Collaboration

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 in Blog, July 2013 | 0 comments

The Importance of Cross Cultural Artistic Collaboration

We are in an era where cultural isolation is not only no longer acceptable it is an absolute liability. I grew up in Zimbabwe, though born in the American Midwest. My experience has always been a cross-cultural one: I was raised by Zimbabwean parents who spent two decades in the US, from the 60s to the 80s and returned to a new African nation. They returned to build their family and invest their Western education and experience in this nation’s future. I grew up in Zimbabwe in a home full of African American literature, from James Baldwin to Toni Morrison, where the mantlepiece was (and still is) decorated by a picture of Martin Luther King that he signed for my mother. I also grew up in a house with parents who spoke mainly Shona to one another, though mainly English to me. Where Sadza (traditional Zimbabwean Meal) was on the dinner table on Friday night and pancakes on Saturday morning. I was in a world where the American influence was apparent but the Zimbabwean presence was resonant. I was raised a Zimerican.

READ MORE
 

COPYRIGHT © 2017 ALMASI ARTS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED